Hello. This is all sorts of tips involving writing and characters. But unfortunately, 'Sam's All Sorts of Tips Involving Writing and Characters' was taken.

If you have any questions or concerns, be sure to shoot me an ask (if it's a major concern or a more personal question, do it off-anon so we can talk it out)!

Submissions of your own tips are welcome

 

Anonymous asked
Do you know of any good creative writing blogs? I'm trying to get back into writing.

Blogs, I’m not too sure of, but promptsandpointers is always good.  The writer’s digest is one of my personal favorites (it’s not a blog, but I like it anyway).  Marysuefacepalm is a good ‘what not to do’ reference, and highly amusing too.

I don’t follow too many writing blogs, actually, but they’re not too hard to come across if you’re in the writing tag.

art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier
There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 
A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.
The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.
Anatomy of the Blade
The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.
Tang
At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.
Ricasso
The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.
Blade
The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.
Edge
The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).
Point
The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.
Strong
The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.
Weak
The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.
Anatomy of the Guard
The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.
Pommel
A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.
Turk’s Head
A spacer between the counter weight and handle.
Handle
The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.
Crossbar Block
The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.
Crossbar
The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.
Sweepings
The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.
Knuckle Guard
Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.
Cup
The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier

There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 

A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.

The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.

  • Anatomy of the Blade

The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.

  • Tang

At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.

  • Ricasso

The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.

  • Blade

The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.

  • Edge

The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).

  • Point

The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.

  • Strong

The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.

  • Weak

The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.

  • Anatomy of the Guard

The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.

  • Pommel

A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.

  • Turk’s Head

A spacer between the counter weight and handle.

  • Handle

The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.

  • Crossbar Block

The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.

  • Crossbar

The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.

  • Sweepings

The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.

  • Knuckle Guard

Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.

  • Cup

The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

miss-nerdgasmz:

RWBY Character Height Chart - Chopped into 7 easy chunks! The Height lines have been copied and shifted between characters so that its easier to compare. The JPG artifacts from the original file still make everything difficult to see, unfortunately. :S

(I HAVE NEVER BEEN SO HAPPY TO BE WRONG ABOUT SOMETHING BEFORE, GOD BLESS)

Tumblr messed up the captions I tried putting on the pictures sooooo-
Everyone’s heights! (if I’m deciphering this chart right… which I highly doubt… Take these with a grain of salt and make your own deductions with the graphics above!)

Ruby = 5’2, Weiss = 5’3 (in heels), Blake = 5’5” (in heels, minus the bow/ears), Yang = 5’8”

Jaune = 6’1, Pyrrha = 6’0 (in heels), Ren = 5’8”, Nora = 5’1”

Sun = 6’0” (God bless), Neptune = 6’3” (GOD BLESS), Penny = 5’3”

Coco = 6’1 (Minus the Beret), Fox = 6’1”, Velvet = 5’6” (MINUS THE EARS), Yatsuhashi = 7’0”

Ironwood = 6’6”, Ozpin = 6’6”, Glynda = 6’6” (in heels), Oobleck = 6’9”, Port = 5’8”

Cinder = 5’10” (in heels), Emerald = 5’8” (in heels), Mercury = 5’11, Roman = 6’1”, Neo = 4’9”

Adam = 6’5”, Hei (Junior) = 6’11”, Miltia and Melanie = 5’6” (in heels)

Compilation of links on writing serial killers:

klariza-helps:

Various links leading back to blogs, articles, rebloggable posts, or asks. Some of these links lead to even more, which is why it seems rather short. I’ve been compiling this for more of a future reference thing for myself, but figured it’s worth sharing. More links will be…

Anonymous asked
Hello! Ur blog is amazing and so useful! Ily! Anyway umm iw anted to ask, is there a page somewhere that can tell me how far places are from each other? For example, idk, Lantana, Miami to Brussels, Belgium. I guess google maps can do that, but I haven't really checked and i wanted to know if there was somewhere that could tell me how long would it take with a specific km/h or stuff like that, so, yeah... Thanks

This is an issue I often find myself faced with.  Basically, my favorite distance calculator is here

And then if you want to know the time from there, scroll down to the second box on here, and then plug in your average speed and your distance (give or take a few hours of sleep), and you should be able to make whatever calculation you’d like.

barefootdramaturg:

jewlesthemagnificent:

oldtobegin:

velveteenrabbit:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

2,000 notes.

JERKING OFF TO THIS

OH GOD LESS VERSUS FEWER THANK YOU FOR ACKNOWLEDGING MY PERSONAL GRAMMATICAL VENDETTA.

By accident. On purpose. Never on accident.

the-nerdwriter asked
Hi! I don't really know what kind of question you want to be asked, but how are you? Happy Labor Day (if you're in America)! Otherwise, Happy Unbirthday! How's your day going so far? I really love your blog, by the way. You post so many useful and help things, so thank you!

Hot-darn, someone asked a question!  It’s been an A+ day so far, and I intend to get a writing tip out there as a labor day present to my followers. It’ll probably be something about writing in a post apocalyptic scenario.

For the most part, if anyone of my followers has a question about who’s running this blog: you know, check to see if I’m a serial killer or not, ask about fandoms, or ask for a writing tip that would generally be too stupid (but, you know there’s no such thing as a stupid question, only stupid people) or small to ask as a main question.

imthejesusofsuburbia:

szarabasjkali:

kissmymahogany:

koopat911:

Notice only 20 shades of gray

It’s been proven that women actually have an acute ability to pick up subtle differences in colors

Then I might be a man because I only see like eight colors in all that mess…

thats probably also because like 1/12 men have some sort of color vision deficiency while only 1/255 women do so

(Source: best-of-memes)

Dear anon: sorry this took me 3 weeks to do, I’ve been out of town, so I didn’t have the notes I took on surfing until today